#DevPolHack

Time to do some testing.
Here are few things to keep in mind:

Usually, participants are quite nervous to test their prototypes with stakeholders and users. Make sure they go through the energizer and relax before this phase.

Usually, participants are quite nervous to test their prototypes with stakeholders and users. Make sure to give them feedback that inspires and encourages them to refine their ideas.

Congratulations! You’ve made it to the final stage of the process – the Testing Stage. Usually, participants are quite nervous to test their prototypes with stakeholders and users. But we assure you, there is nothing to worry about. In this phase, you might just find the most crucial feedback that makes your idea the winning one!

a. Intro game

Usually, participants are quite nervous to test their prototypes with stakeholders and users. This warm up is a way to generate positive energy among participants and put them a bit more at ease before testing. In this version, the entre group must agree on a character and then all have to turn around on command and all represent the same figure. The first to three points is the winner.

  1. Split the group into two equal teams. Each team must stand in a row opposite each other, the distance between both groups must be at least 2m.
  2. Each team must decide what role to play. Either the whole group portrays:
  • An old grandmother waving her finger as if saying ‘no!’
  • A tiger poised with its claws out as if attacking a wild animal – or
  • A samurai brandishing their sword in a chopping motion while stepping forward
  1. The winning team will win the best out of 5 (or the first to 3) using the following:
  • If they both play the same role, then it’s a tie and you start again.
  • The samurai trumps the tiger
  • The tiger trumps the grandmother
  • The grandmother trumps the samurai
  1. On the start command, the players of each group go 2 – 3 steps away from each other and turn their backs to each other. The game master counts to ten slowly, during which time each player must have decided which role to play.
  2. Then at the count of ten, each group rapidly turns to face each other in the role they have collectively decided on while acting out the character they have assumed.
  3. Repeat until you have a winner.

For this game and some more examples, check out this link

b. Iteration and Validation

Congratulations! You’ve made it to the final stage of the process – the Testing Stage.

Like all stages, there’s no sharp line between the Prototyping Stage and the Testing Stage. The main difference is that testing involves putting a prototype into use in a real-life environment, with real-life users. In saying ‘real-life environment,’ we’re interested in seeing if the prototype is developed enough to actually deliver a programme, service or product to the people most-affected by it, them being ‘real-life users.’ Ultimately, you’re testing to get reactions from the most-affected people and measuring to understand whether your proposed solution improves their experience.

The Testing Stage requires your team to put the solutions that you’ve designed into practice in order to accept or reject them. Here, you have the ability to add or remove parts of the concept until the full experience is produced. Only then can your team finalise the details of what will be launched.

It’s crucial to mention that testing isn’t about one-size-fits-all solutions. Each case is unique and requires your team to determine the best way to take solutions forward based on stakeholder needs, people’s experiences, existing processes, etc. To this end, this stage provides a range of tools to choose from, including imagining service scenarios, journey mapping, solution framing, concept testing and campaign/programme/service/product blueprinting. You’ll see how to bring these tools to life in the pages that follow.

Here’s a last piece of advice on the Testing Stage: At this point, you should be open to witnessing and capturing how people react to your solution in the real world.

Service Scenario (to be worked on with your mentors)

Service Scenarios are used when concepts are being developed and validated. Scenarios focus on defining the customer experience that will enable the business goals. They are a fantastic way to help the organisation explore the idea of operating in new ways in a quick and engaging format. How to? Use the idea development template from the step before and present the envisioned experience to potential users or beneficiaries. Best way to do it is by phone or through a short video call. Prepare yourself to present clearly and listen carefully. Watch out for what steps they need to take to understand your solution, what they think , what they do and what they feel. Use the Miro template, one template per target persona to capture the insights.  

How to?

Explain the envisioned experience by narrating a relevant story of use. Use this template, one template per target persona.

Now, after all the collected feedback, check and edit your Idea Development Template from Chapter 5.